Minter Exchange
Dedicated to Minter families everywhere

first:  last: 
[Advanced Search]  [Surnames]

The Minters of Kent

The people who first perpetuated the name of Minter in Kent lived in the part of the County to the North-East and East of Canterbury. This suggests they may have originated on the Isle of Thanet, the land given in 449 AD to the Jutes by King Vortigern. Here they remained until fairly recent times.

Some later migrated south as far as Dover and Folkestone. By the time of the Civil War enclaves of Minters had developed in and around Ash and at Folkestone and these principally represent the two halves of the Minters in Kent. Not until the mid-18th century did they stray as far west as Faversham. With the coming of industry and the railways, a few travelled as far as Bromley and beyond.

Post-Commonwealth Minters can be formed into large branches or groups and each group is treated separately because no connection has yet been found which links them together. A lot of time and study has been devoted to ensuring that these families have been assembled in the most likely groupings, given the information that has so far been gathered. Further progress is dependant upon fresh information and if anyone has reason to disagree with or doubt any of the connections indicated they are most welcome, in the interests of progress, to submit their thoughts or findings for consideration - they should be sent by email to John Minter at the email address on the Home Page.

A by-product of research has been a collection of fragments of families and individuals which cannot be connected to the main family groups. These are the subject of the Miscellaneous group and suggestions concerning their true positioning are always welcome.

Much of the research into the history of the Kent Minters has been carried out over the past 50+ years by Cliff Minter of Canterbury and others. Most of the information, prior to that derived from censuses, has been collected from study of the Parish Registers of the villages and towns where Minters were born, married and buried. So information from that source can be regarded as original, even if it conflicts with other sources such as the IGI. In the interests of brevity, information sources are not in fact quoted on this website but if they are required they can be obtained from John Minter at the address on the Home Page.

The placing of families in geographical locations is normally determined by the area inhabited by the earliest generations but sometimes by the area with which a family became most closely associated.

Acknowledgements
(all of Kent): Cliff Minter, the late Merrilyn Minter, Rex Minter, Alfred Minter, Carol Kinnon, Margaret Young, Catherine King, Margaret Connolly, Kirkham Sidney Minter, Lloyd Craig Minter
Apologies to anyone who may have been missed!

Ash (1)

George Minter

In terms of the number of individuals it contains (3770 as at March 2012), Ash (1) is the largest Minter group. Its most senior member, George of Stourmouth, was born about 1640 - 1645 but not baptized until 1715. His parents may have been Henry (born about 1610) and Elizabeth of Ash, Kent but this has not been proved (see Preston below). The family spread to many parts of Kent, to various locations in London and the Home Counties and overseas to Australia, Canada and the USA. It has many living descendants including Alan Minter the world-champion boxer.

Although no blood relationship has been found between the Ash and Ash(2) groups, there is a link through marriage, via the Bundock family.

Acknowledgements (in alphabetical order):
Bronte Alchin, Neil Alderman, Julie Allen, Rosemary Andrew, Jacqui Andrews, Zoë Barnes, Ted Blowers, Janet Brandon, Christine Brown, John Brown, Kirrily Cant, Andrew Carter, Tony Chapman, Robbie Charleston, Dawn Cole, Carol Cooper, Bryan Darney, Mary Dobson, Roz Doyle, June Dye, Jan Geddes, Gail Gniewosz, Maggie Goring, Gillian Green, Steve Green, Stephanie & Chris Greer, John Hills, Mary Hutchins, Gina Jonas, Anne Kelley, Robyn Lewis, Avice Marshall, Amba Mcgoldrick, Sean McGrath, Russell McGuiness, Cliff Minter of Australia, Col Minter, Elaine & Marrain Minter, Ellen Minter, Hilary Minter, Jack Minter, Julie Minter, Mellissa Minter, Michael Minter, Teresa Minter, Trevor Minter, David Murphy, Andrea Neill, Dianne Newton, John Nix, Debbie Noakes, Daren Northern, Tracey O'Leary, Keith Osborne, Trudi Panter, Margaret Parmenter, Tracey Patterson, Virginia Pudelka, Malcolm Purvis, Karen Quilter, Anna Richards, Christina Riley, Ruth Rolfe, Amanda Rowntree, Rhonda Ryan, Cally Schneider, Diane Scholl, Neil Simmons, Philip N Simmons (USA), Brian Spratt, Angelina Stein, Greg Taylor, Bobby Thorn, Keith Thornborrow, Linda Thornton, Maureen Vince, Lesley Walker, Katie Wells, Paul Wicks, Caroline Wood

Ash (2)

Henry Minter

This relatively small branch of the Kent Minters has been traced back as far as a Henry Minter, who was born about 1680 and married in 1700. Although Henry married in Ash and raised a family there, no connection to the larger Ash group, Ash (1), has been found (except by marriage via the Bundock family). Most of the family stayed in Kent, including a branch from which many blacksmiths came, centred on Boughton Blean.

Acknowledgements:
David Leman, Denise Smith, Frank Sandwell

Canterbury (1)

Thomas Minter

The history of the Canterbury Minters has been traced back to Thomas Minter, who was probably born at Ash (he married 'as a husbandman of Ash'). The marriage, to Hannah Merchant, took place on 14 January 1699/00 at St Paul's, Canterbury and the couple's children were all born in Canterbury. It's conceivable that Thomas was the brother, born about 1650, of Henry Minter of Preston next Wingham and that he was married to Elizabeth Marrell (or Murrell) before marrying Hannah Merchant after Elizabeth's death in 1698. But there is no evidence to support this idea and it is mentioned here only for completeness and in the hope that someone may be able to prove it.
The Canterbury family grew rapidly in the first half of the 18th century: Thomas and Hannah had 11 children including Robert and Henry who between them had 29 children. Some of the male family members prospered as blacksmiths, butchers, coachmakers and corn dealers and several became Freemen of Canterbury. In the 19th century some of the Canterbury Minters moved away, some to Australia and the USA, others to other parts of the UK, including the Isle of Wight and London.

Acknowledgements:
The late Mrs Regina Christensen, Jim & Roz Grevett, Stephen Minter, Peter Durrant, Colin Marsh, Roy Minter, Heather McVicar, Jon Cochrane, Heather Wheeler, Neville A Daniels, Paul Twynam, Natalie Hansen, Jon Cochrane, Wendy Van Loon-Faulkner, Suzanne Cousens, Kerri Scott, Richard Hawke

Folkestone

Leonard Minter

The Folkestone Minters are among the more interesting Minter families. At present the head of the family is treated as being Leonard Minter whose dates are unknown but whose first child was born about 1607. From an early date Minters were important people in the town, several having served as mayor and others as jurats. Early generations of the family were mainly involved with the sea as fishermen and mariners; later on family members became butchers, bakers, solicitors and surgeons. Among the more colourful sons were John who lived for many years in Holland and owned a boat, the 'Vrei Brodiers' (Four Brothers), which was involved in a smuggling incident in 1823; and John Moolenburgh Minter who became a physician to Queen Victoria.
As with many families, the 19th century saw a dispersal and members of the family found their way to London and Australia.

Acknowledgements:
Brenda Page, Christine Mabbs, Debbie Williams, Glyn Jones, Terry Duggan, Valerie Page, Roderick Craig, Angela Bryson, Rosemary Henschell, Sue Cooper, Tim Kendall, Paul McCann, Joyce Tole-Muir, Chris Minter, Robert Minter, Nico Delst (The Netherlands), Darren Murdy, Wendy Amendola, Pat Galovich, Lana Ricardo, Carolina Minter, Eve Adams, Tim Kendall, Mavis Roper, Philippa and Nigel Monks, Marion Claxton, Clif Knight, Nick Cornwell-Smith

Ickham

Henry Minter

The most senior member of the Ickham family, Henry Minter, was born about 1643 - 1644 and was first known of Preston, Kent . His parents may have been Henry (born about 1610) and Elizabeth of Ash, Kent but this has not been proved (see Preston below). The family is the second largest Minter group and has many living descendants, including some from branches which established themselves in Burton upon Trent, Staffordshire and Huddersfield, Yorkshire in England, and in Australia.

Acknowledgements:
Ian Brown, Graham Dowle, Valerie Hayter, Trevor Cox, Mike Payne, Terri Lomax, Roger Davies, Cherry Minter, Andrew Miller, Patricia Morris, Paula Boddington, Paul Julian, Elaine Minter, Melanie Boulton, Richard Stanley, Graham Minter, Peter Marshall, Pearla Petrie, Margaret Pearless, Jenny Donner, Pauline K Minter, John Gordon Minter, Enid Minter, Rosemary Henschell, Gavin Heaton, Betty Cole, Jackie Minter, Derek Kenton, Stephanie Minter, Anthony & Brian Minter, Suse Hogan, Michele Schreiner, Derek Kenton, Kizzy Minter, Tonja Grönholm, Sheila Kilvington, Edward Scriven, Sarah Parkin, Simon Arnold, Alexandra Minter, Angela Godfrey, Bill Minter, Geoff Knott, George Murdoch, Michael Westcott, Lynn Harris, John Barrand

Preston

George Minter

The head of this group is George Minter, born in Kent about 1577. The identity of his wife is unknown but they had five sons. Little is known about four of the sons but Henry Minter, who was born about 1610, married Mary Raphe on 1 October 1635 at St Mary Magdalene, Canterbury. Mary was buried on 17 December 1638 and Henry married his second wife Elizabeth some time after that. As noted above, Henry and Elizabeth may have been the parents of George of Ash(1) and Henry of Ickham.

Acknowledgements:
Paul Collins

Thanet

Henry Minter

Henry Minter, the first known member of this group, married in St Lawrence, Thanet in 1768. Most of his descendants moved to London.

Acknowledgements:
Colleen Crompton

Whitstable

George Minter

The Whitstable group's most senior member, George Minter, married in Ash in 1699 and his children were baptised in Minster. The family had strong associations with Thanet - some members lived in St Lawrence and Ramsgate and others moved along the coast to Whitstable. The Minters of Northumberland are related to the Whitstable family.

Acknowledgements:
Suzannah Foad, Janet Barrett, Trevor Gosling, Jan Peake, Joan Hoey, Julie Furey, Kat Day, Chris Horgan, Anne Ellem, Bob Gamble, Margaret Saunter, Dick Holmes, Janet Read, Sally Rogers, Merlin Minter.

Miscellaneous

As far as possible the fragmentary families and individuals are listed by location.

Canterbury (2)

Sarah Marsh

The only know ancestor of this family is Sarah Marsh who is believed to have had three illegitimate children. The father of at least one of the children, Edward, was probably a Minter since Edward's middle name was Minter. But the identity of Edward's father isn't known.
Edward had a number of children. One of them, originally Herbert Minter MARSH, eventually dropped the name Marsh and, as Herbert Minter is the ancestor of a Minter family which has branches in Australia, Africa and England.

Acknowledgements:
Florence Wilkie nee Minter, Hazel Minter, John Davies

Canterbury (3)

George Minter

This small family is headed by George Minter who was born illegitimately to Harriet Minter in 1813. Unfortunately it hasn't been possible to find out anything about Harriet. There are several living descendants.

Acknowledgements:
Suzanne Minter

Dover

John Stephen Minter

There is a mystery about the Dover Minter family, namely that it appears to have sprung from a family called Hammond. John and Amy Hammond had five children and some time in the 1850s or early 1860s at least three of them decided to start using the Minter surname.

Acknowledgements:
Heather Robinson

Dover (2)

Phineas Minter

The second small Dover group has been included for historical purposes - its senior member, Phineas Minter, was baptised in 1566/7. Unfortunately his parents aren't known and although Phineas had two wives and eleven children nothing is known about their descendants.

Acknowledgements:
Cliff Minter

Elmstone

Robert Minter

This small family group was originally placed in the 'Waifs & strays' section. The head of the family was Robert Minter. He had seven children by two wives, Ann then Barbara, but little is known about their subsequent history.

Acknowledgements:

Goodnestone

George Minter

Head of this family was George Minter, who was born about 1743. He married and raised his family in Woodnesborough (see below). The family became associated with Goodnestone in the late 1700s. It's possible that the Goodnestone and Woodnesborough families are linked but there is no evidence of this. There are no known living descendants.

Acknowledgements:
Lynda Williams

Sandwich

Michael Minter

Michael Minter was born between 1791 and 1793 and has first been found living in Sandwich in 1817. He may have originated in Folkestone - his Christian name is common among Folkestone Minters - but no evidence to support this has been found.

Acknowledgements:

Temple Ewell

George Minter

This small late 16th and early 17th century family is included for historical interest. There are no known descendants.

Acknowledgements:
Cliff Minter

Thanet (2)

John Hardy Minter

This is an interesting family whose origins are obscure. The most senior member was John Hardy Minter of Callis Court Farm, St Peters Thanet. He is known to have had a son Henry Minter, about whom little is known, and a daughter Elizabeth Minter. Henry had a son William who was given (or adopted) the second name Vincer and all his descendants used this name and passed it on to their children. Even some of the wives of family members adopted the name when they married. Why the family was so insistent on using the Vincer name is not known: it may be because Henry Minter married a Vincer (as did his sister Elizabeth). At times the name was used with a hyphen so that people were called Vincer-Minter. Several of the members of the family were Workhouse Masters and some of the females married other Workhouse Masters.

Acknowledgements:
Lynn Nugent, Katherine Chaveli

Woodnesborough

George Minter

Head of this family was George Minter, who was married in Canterbury in 1730 and raised his family in Woodnesborough. It's possible that the Woodnesborough and Goodnestone families are linked but there is no evidence of this.
In December 2008 it was established that the Woodnesborough family is linked to the main Ash family. This is a result of the marriage in 1837 between Mary A Belsey, daughter of John Belsey and Ann Walker Minter (Ash group), and Robert Petley, son of Thomas Petley and Ann Minter (Woodnesborough group). The Woodnesborough family remains separately documented however.

Acknowledgements:
Ian Phillpott, Jenny Aitkenhead